Edisto's jewel, Botany Bay Wildlife Management Area


Botany Bay is many things to many people. It's the ocean, and the creeks.
It's the animals and birds and insects. It's wildflowers and history. To many of
us it's over 4,000 acres of heaven.

To learn more about Botany Bay we suggest you start here.

If you plan to visit Botany Bay
we suggest you visit the following page - click here

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Want to help preserve and protect Botany Bay? SC DNR has set up
a fund specifically to help. Click here to learn how!

This is a pdf file and may take a moment to load.

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To see our 2010 bluebird hatching statistics click here!

Newly featured on UScoastalhighway17.com

To see a slide show on You Tube Click Here

Some interesting statistics

SCDNR reports that for 2010 there were 47,390 visitors, a decrease from
2009 when 61,590 came through. So far in 2012, in six months, there have been 26,360. They also report that in 2010 we had 7,044 volunteer hours, a significant increase from 2009 when our dedicated volunteers put in
5405 hours. So far in 2012 we are at 5,147 or the equivilent of 128.6 40 hour work weeks.

In 2010 Botany Bay hosted 739 hunters who harvested 23 bucks and 43 does. Statistics for 2011 begin to show a rebound in visitors and continued strong participation by our volunteers who greet visitors, help them learn the rules, share the plantation's history, and do a lot of heavy maintenance from painting to equipment repair.

Become a part of the volunteer corps... contact our coordinator Bess Kellett


Notice:

SC DNR has announced that Botany Bay
Wildlife Management Area will be closed on Tuesdays for essential maintenance.

Please:
Spring is here and our snakes are active. They want to avoid you as much as you want to avoid them, please give them the chance. And particularlly, if you are driving and see one in the road DO NOT hit it with your car!

Don't run over snakes!

2010-11 Hunt dates - Botany will be CLOSED

Just Updated July 13, 2011

Click Here for Schedule

Shelling no longer allowed.
The earlier policies were abused and had to be reconsidered.

Shelling prohibited on Botany Bay WMA

We are well aware that abuse continues. Backpacks, coolers and other closed containers may be subject to review upon leaving the beach area by SCDNR enforcement officers. Your cooperation is appreciated.

Also Very Important

There is a sign-in procedure for visitors. It’s called a day pass permit system. You fill out part A with your name, number in party, and hometown, and drop in the kiosk section, and put the other part on your rearview mirror.
Everyone must have one. If it’s not displayed in sight,
you will be subjected to a fine from $110-$470.
Also, there is NO sign out.

Preserving History, Protecting the Environment

To see new images and learn more
Bleak Hall
click here

To visit SC DNR's driving tour for Botany Bay
click here

To read about Botany Bay WMA in South Carolina Wildlife Magazine
click here

Botany Bay is part of the internationally known ACE Basin.
To learn more about the ACE Basin click here.

Violations of SC DNR Rules on Botany Bay Plantation
can be reported through Operation Game Thief

1-800-922-5431

You are encouraged to call and report violations
you personally witness.

tidal erosion has left this legacy on the small beach at Botany Bay.

 

 

Botany Bay Plantation was
opened to the public by the SC Department
of Natural Resources in 2008.
The property is over 4,000 acres and ranges from woods to wetlands to fields. There is a small beach which ranks second along the South Carolina Coast for Sea Turtle nesting. That beach provides one of the rare nesting areas for Wilson's plovers and the Least Tern, both threatened in SC. It is a fragile place where man must tread gently to avoid destroying the very things that attract us there. Yes even venomous snakes are protected here... do not harm them!

turtle nests being protected at Botany Bay WMA

 

 

SCDNR has established rules designed to
protect the beach including no shelling, no dogs on the beach or on the causeway to the beach, and the bird nesting areas are roped off. Of course there is to be no disturbing the turtle nests! There is regular surveillance and enforcement of the rules. Surveillance cameras are utilized in many areas. Many people on Edisto are devoted to protection of this wonderful property generously donated to SC.

 

 

the ruins of Sea Cloud Plantation's mansion speak to the days of Sea Island Cotton

 

Back on the mainland, the ruins of Sea Cloud Plantation's foundation give testament to the wealth of Sea Island Cotton and are only a part of the precious heritage that rests on Botany Bay Plantation which was also home to legendary Bleak Hall. All key historic sites are fenced and all are marked with signs warning against collecting artifacts. No metal detectors are allowed within the Wildlife Management Area.

EIPA continues to work with the Botany Bay Volunteer program to help SC DNR protect these environmental, cultural and historic treasures. We continue to talk with SC DNR about how best to accomplish our mutual goals. If you would like to join the discussion or volunteer to help contact us at:

PreserveEdisto@bellsouth.net

If you plan to visit Botany Bay
we suggest you visit the following page - click here

To learn more about Botany's history and what you can
expect to see on your visit - click here

To learn about &/or Sign Up for
Botany Bay Volunteer
Project

How important are places like Botany Bay to
Edisto Island's economy... consider what visitors to SC want:

Quick Facts about South Carolina's Natural Resource Assets

Blessed with incredible natural bounty and beauty, South Carolina's natural resources are essential for economic development. The overall value of SC's natural resources is, in some ways, immeasurable. Economic activities tied to the state's resource base sustain nearly $30 billion in tangible economic benefits for South Carolina. Approximately 235,000 jobs are linked to activities that depend on our natural resource base. (Study completed at University of South Carolina Moore School of Business ~ 2009)

provided by: South Carolina Department of Natural Resources

 

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